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3 Compelling Reasons Every School Should Offer ACT & SAT Test Prep

 

SAT test prepWhen it comes to ACT and SAT test prep, many school districts may wonder what the benefit of implementing a test prep program could be. After all, many students prepare for their SAT or ACT tests without an institutionalized preparation program. Why not allow each individual student to handle the test preparation, thus saving a school's valuable time and money?

However, the money your district spends on SAT and ACT test prep, will come back to the district many, many times over.

ACT and SAT test prep programs take the guesswork out of test-taking for your students, while providing score-raising preparation to students who might not otherwise prepare. They also help teachers prepare students for standardized testing. 

Since so many things ride on school-wide test scores—including but not limited to funding for your school—it makes sense to prepare your students so that your school is more likely to have students with higher test scores.

But if you need even more reasons to consider ACT and SAT test prep, we’ve spelled out the three most common reasons below.

ACT and SAT Test Prep Evens the Playing Field

Some students may opt to invest additional time and money by preparing for the SAT or the ACT on their own. But this is an expensive and time-consuming process, one which many students simply cannot afford. So rather than give the advantage only to students who can afford standardized testing prep courses, a school-wide prep course evens the playing field.

This ensures that all students in your school, not just those with enough time or money, can prepare themselves adequately for the SAT or the ACT. It also helps students score better, who wouldn't otherwise prepare for their tests (many don't even know it's an option, for example).

This gives your entire test-taking segment a chance at better scores, instead of just a select few. And this means your school stands a better chance of having higher test scores across the board. 

ACT and SAT Test Prep Teaches Strategy

Ask a lawyer how they made it through the LSAT, one of the most notoriously difficult standardized entrance examinations in the United States. She'll likely tell you that learning the strategy behind the questions is more important than knowing the answer. 

The same is true for ACT and SAT testing. While many teachers work hard to teach students the content of the SAT or the ACT, the most important thing to know is the strategy of the test itself.

This is where a specialized ACT and SAT test preparation course  can make all the difference. It is impossible for students to learn and memorize every single answer to every question that could possibly be on the SAT or the ACT.  

But if students know the strategy behind each question—which is a major part of any good test prep program—they will better understand how to apply logic and reason to each question. As you might guess, this helps them answer more questions correctly more often. And it really shows in composite scores across a class.

ACT and SAT Test Prep Means Better Scores

The bottom line is that if your students know what to expect, then they will be better able to take the test and make good scores in the process. If your school district scrutinizes your test scores as a means to decide funding or offer access to important programs, then your best insurance is to offer your students a standardized test prep course. Your district stands to gain much more in funding (and prestige) than it will spend offering SAT and ACT test prep to your students.

 

Image courtesy : Brian Clift/Flickr

Comments

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Posted @ Friday, October 04, 2013 1:13 AM by pmp training courses
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